TikTok And America’s Last-Ditch Desperation For Social Mobility

TikTok And America’s Last-Ditch Desperation For Social Mobility

Tyler Durden

Wed, 08/05/2020 – 12:50

Authored by Charles Hugh Smith via OfTwoMinds blog,

Social media offers hope of achieving higher social status, something that is increasingly out of reach in our winner-take-most economy.

I’ve often addressed the decline of social mobility and the addictive nature of social media, for example, Why Is Social Media So Toxic?

I have long held that the decline of social mobility–broad-based opportunities to get ahead financially and socially–is part of a larger dynamic I call social depression: the social decay resulting from economic stagnation and the decline of social mobility and financial security. America’s Social Depression Is Accelerating.

Japan offers a real-world 30-year lab experiment in the negative social consequences of economic stagnation, a topic I’ve addressed since 2010: The Non-Financial Cost of Stagnation: “Social Recession” and Japan’s “Lost Generations”

The conventional explanation of social media’s addictive hold is that it activates the human brain’s reward circuits much like an addictive drug: in effect, we become addicted to being “liked” and to checking our phones hundreds of times a day to see if we received any “likes”.

FOMO, fear of missing out on some emotion-stimulating “news” or a “like” from someone in our network also feeds the addictiveness.